IMO: Ocean Fertilization to Be Regulated under …

first_imgzoom Marine geoengineering, including ocean fertilization, will be regulated under amendments to the 1996 Protocol to the international treaty which regulates the dumping of wastes and other matter at sea.The amendments, adopted on Friday (18 October) by Parties to the 1996 Protocol to the Convention on the Prevention of Marine Pollution by Dumping of Wastes and Other Matter, 1972, add a new article 6bis which states that “Contracting Parties shall not allow the placement of matter into the sea from vessels, aircraft, platforms or other man-made structures at sea for marine geoengineering activities listed in Annex 4, unless the listing provides that the activity or the sub-category of an activity may be authorized under a permit”.Marine geoengineering is defined as “a deliberate intervention in the marine environment to manipulate natural processes, including to counteract anthropogenic climate change and/or its impacts, and that has the potential to result in deleterious effects, especially where those effects may be widespread, long-lasting or severe”.A new Annex 4 on “Marine geoengineering” lists “Ocean fertilization”, defined as “any activity undertaken by humans with the principal intention of stimulating primary productivity in the oceans. Ocean fertilization does not include conventional aquaculture, or mariculture, or the creation of artificial reefs.”The Annex provides that all ocean fertilization activities other than those referred to above shall not be permitted.An ocean fertilization activity may only be considered for a permit if it is assessed as constituting legitimate scientific research taking into account any specific placement assessment framework.A new annex V adds the Assessment Framework for matter that may be considered for placement under Annex 4. The Assessment framework provides that Contracting Parties should consider any advice on proposals for activities listed from independent international experts or an independent international advisory group of experts.The amendments will enter into force 60 days after two thirds of the Contracting Parties have deposited an instrument of acceptance of the amendment with IMO. (The London Protocol currently has 43 Parties.)Mr. Stefan Micallef, Director, Marine Environment Division, International Maritime Organization (IMO) commended the adoption of the amendment to regulate the placement of matter for ocean fertilization and other marine geoengineering activities.“This is a true testament to the fact that the London Protocol continues to be among the most advanced international regulatory instruments addressing human activities in the marine environment and there is no doubt that this much-awaited amendment will be appreciated by other international bodies. The amendment also reflects the scientific-based approach of the London Convention and its 1996 Protocol,” Mr. Micallef said.Representatives of the Contracting Parties to the Convention on the Prevention of Marine Pollution by Dumping of Wastes and Other Matter, 1972 (London Convention) and to the 1996 Protocol thereto (London Protocol), were in London for their 35th/8th meeting, held from 14 to 18 October at the Headquarters of IMO, which hosts the Office for the London Convention and Protocol.The London Protocol prohibits the dumping of wastes and other matter at sea except for those on a short permitted list, for which permits must be sought.The adoption of amendments relating to marine geoengineering follows discussion on the matter in previous LC/LP meetings. An agreement issued in 2008 stated that ocean fertilization activities, other than legitimate scientific research, should not be allowed. In 2010, the Parties approved an “Assessment Framework for Scientific Research Involving Ocean Fertilization.”IMO, October 21, 2013last_img read more

Devon holiday camp hosts teen Calais asylum seekers

first_imgA spokesman said they could not confirm when and if more refugees were arriving.  A spokesman for the Home Office said they could not comment on operational details.One local community leader said Great Torrington was a “bizarre” choice as he claimed Government and council officials had failed to consult the town’s 5,000-strong population.”We are a very tolerant, accommodating community but that is a very large amount of people,” said Nick Hallam, secretary of the Great Torrington Cavaliers, which has won The Queen’s Award for voluntary service. “This is the first we have heard about it and I think that the Home Office should have consulted with the local community on these things.” Child refugees from the Calais jungle are being housed in a 17th-century manor house in rural Devon, The Telegraph can disclose.Up to 70 refugees are set to be taken to Beam House, which is about two miles from market town Great Torrington in the north of the county, with the first group of 20 arriving in the early hours of Monday morning.At lunchtime on Monday, a group played basketball in the picturesque grounds of the historic estate while four guards dressed in black manned the lengthy driveway. The house, which is home to PGL holiday camps, is situated on the bank of the River Torridge.It is usually houses children on adventure holidays, with activities typically including abseiling, climbing, archery and motorsports. The grounds also boast a high ropes course.The facility welcomed the first arrivals under the “Dubs amendment”, which grants refuge to the most vulnerable. Geoffrey Cox, Conservative MP for Torridge and West Devon, has said the move would not be a “permanent institution” and the hostel would act as a processing centre. “The majority of the children will only be here for a few days,” he said.PGL – which advertises seven day stays from £450-a-week – has been contacted for comment.The arrival of youngsters in the UK comes as the bulldozers prepare to move in to destroy the Jungle camp where they were based.Last week the Government faced questions over its ability to check the age of new arrivals into Britain when some appeared to be far older than 18. Some 3,000 children are being taken in from camps in the Middle East, while some who have made it as far as mainland Europe are also being resettled in Britain if they have close family links.A Home Office spokesperson said: “We continue to explore a range of suitable accommodation throughout the UK for refugees and asylum seekers, including those who have arrived in the last week and those who will arrive in the coming days.“We are working closely with NGOs, charities, private contractors, local authorities and MPs across the country to ensure the children receive the appropriate care and support when they get here.       “We are grateful to those who have stepped forward and provided assistance.” Rooms at PGL Beam House, where youngsters from Calais are staying Rooms at PGL Beam House, where youngsters from Calais are stayingCredit:PGL website Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings.center_img One shop owner, who did not want to be named, said the refugees had “fallen on their feet” with the accommodation.The 57-year-old added: “It does seem a strange place to put them up. It is almost as if they [the authorities] want to just get them out of London, their families probably aren’t even down here. One of the big cities, Exeter or Plymouth or something, that would be better, somewhere more multi-cultural.”But Sean Harrison, 53, said he had no problem with the move.“It is something we should be doing something about. If here is a place that has correct facilities, they should be welcome.”Devon County Council confirmed 20 youngsters had arrived at Beam House in the early hours of Monday morning. The market town of Great TorringtonCredit:Rex The market town of Great Torrington PGL runs children's adventure holidays at Beam House PGL runs children’s adventure holidays at Beam HouseCredit:PGLlast_img read more

Man charged with murder after fatal assault at Colnbrook Immigration Centre

first_img Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. The centre is adjacent to Heathrow Airport, and is run by Mitie Care and Custody, which won the contract to run the centre in 2014 after Serco ran it from its opening in 2004.Yusif will appear in custody on December 3 at Hendon Magistrates’ Court.Two other men also arrested on suspicion of attempted murder were released back to the centre without charge. A man has been charged with murder after a fatal assault at an immigration facility in Greater London, police said.Zana Assad Yusif, 31, care of Colnbrook Immigration Removal Centre, has been charged with the murder of 64-year-old Tarek Chowdhury.Following an incident at Colnbrook Removal Centre in Harmondsworth, West Drayton on Thursday, Mr Chowdhury was taken to hospital but died at 9.30pm, police said.Colnbrook, in Harmondsworth, West Drayton, Hillingdon, detains people subject to immigration control and has the capacity to hold up to 396 men and 27 women.last_img read more