Sherlock Holmes 3 Considers Filming in Morocco

Rabat – Will another Hollywood production shoot in Morocco? According to American movie-focused outlet Omega Underground, the third part of the Sherlock Holmes saga could film some scenes in locations within the Kingdom.Besides Morocco, the movie is already set to shoot primarily in London, the home of the characters.For this new adventure, American actor Robert Downey Jr. will again don his Sherlock Holmes suit, while British actor Jude Law will assume his role as Holmes’s sidekick, Dr. Watson. Original director Guy Ritchie has not been confirmed yet to return. Warner Bros. plans to release its production on December 25, 2020. The far-off launch date may be a result of the leading actor’s busy schedule. Downey Jr. just finished shooting the last Avengers film and Jude Law is about to wrap up filming for  Captain Marvel.Released in 2010, Sherlock Holmes is the story of the legendary detective of the same name, accompanied by his sidekick Dr. Watson; the duo relentlessly pursues criminals of all kinds. Holmes’s weapons are: a keen sense of observation and deduction, erudition, and curiosity.Morocco will welcome two other Hollywood productions this year. Keanu Reeves’s famous John Wick saga is revving up for round three in the kingdom. The Canadian actor is set to shoot in the North African country, following filming which began in Japan and Montreal April 25.Additionally, American actor, singer, and filmmaker Johnny Depp will soon fly to the kingdom with British actors Robert Pattinson and Mark Rylance to shoot Waiting for the Barbarians, produced by Colombian filmmaker Ciro Guerra.“We hope to start shooting at the end of the year in Morocco. It will be my first film outside of Colombia and in English,” said the director in a statement to AFP. read more

Millions of Iraqi children benefiting from UNbacked school supplies programme

The drive, organized by the Iraqi Education Ministry and the UN Children’s Fund (UNICEF) with support from the European Commission, aims to reach all Iraqi primary schools, bringing basic learning tools to millions of children aged 6 to 11. “Iraq’s parents and teachers have shown unshaken determination to educate their children through years of deprivation, but the current terrible insecurity is testing many to the limit,” UNICEF Representative for Iraq Roger Wright said, calling on the international community to provide more support to protect the war-torn country’s education system during the current emergency. “Iraq’s education system needs a great deal more investment and attention to survive this time of crisis.” The system is now dangerously vulnerable, with many schools not operating normally. Violence is compounding the corrosive effects of years of under-investment throughout the 1990s, depleting teaching staff and eroding school infrastructure. The current insecurity is making the choice for families to send their children to school a life-threatening one in some areas. Over 800,000 children may now be out of school according to a recent estimate by Save the Children UK, up from 600,000 in 2004. These children are likely to miss out on their right to education altogether unless they receive urgent support and protection. Mr. Wright acknowledged the great commitment by the Government to prioritize education even under the most difficult circumstances. In the last two years alone more than 159 damaged school buildings and 800 school water and sanitation facilities have been restored, 30,000 teachers retrained and basic school materials delivered directly to Iraq’s children with the support of UNICEF and partners including the UN Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) and the European Commission. “Schools are a symbol of hope to Iraq’s families,” Mr. Wright said. “We must do everything in our power to keep Iraq’s classroom doors open, welcoming and safe for children.” Materials will be distributed both centrally from Baghdad and directly to local governorates, reaching even the most remote schools. Supplies will arrive in classrooms in advance of the second half of the school year. 15 February 2007Millions of school bags, books, pencils and other essential learning materials are now being delivered to Iraq’s primary schoolchildren thanks to a United Nations-backed national school supply drive. read more