10 months agoTottenham boss Pochettino: We deserved Cardiff win for sheer effort

first_imgTottenham boss Pochettino: We deserved Cardiff win for sheer effortby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveTottenham boss Mauricio Pochettino was delighted with the passion of his players for their 3-0 win at Cardiff City.Harry Kane had previously scored at least once against 27 of the 28 Premier League opponents he had faced, with Cardiff the solitary team he had failed to net against in three previous encounters.But Kane needed only two and a half minutes to put that record straight on New Year’s Day, and further goals from Christian Eriksen and Son Heung-min provided a swift panacea to the pain of losing 3-1 at home to Wolves on Saturday.Pochettino said: “We felt disappointed (after Wolves loss) and we wanted to show our energy from the beginning. After 20 minutes we showed how we wanted to play and were clinical.”We suffered with four games in 10 days. I want to congratulate the players. I’m so pleased with the effort.”Today we showed great energy and maturity that we want. Now we need to keep that level and consistency throughout the season if we want to be there and fight for big things.”It’s a crazy fixture (list) – its normal that in some games we can drop our mental energy. We were so relaxed and kept calm, it was so important. We showed Wolves was just an accident.”The most important thing is to find a way to be consistent if we want to be a contender. We need to believe more in us. We are in a process of doing fantastic things.” About the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

VANCOUVERS FIRST LADY OF JAZZ STILL GOING STRONG AT 99

first_imgInitially ostracizedBut recognition and reward did not come immediately — nor easily — for Collins in 1940’s Vancouver.When the Collins family — Collins, her husband of 70 years Richard, and their four children — moved into an all-white area of Burnaby, they weren’t exactly welcomed. Eleanor Collins, Vancouver’s First Lady of Jazz, turned 99 this week. Advertisement Eleanor Collins, Vancouver jazz great, prepares for an episode of ‘The Eleanor Show’. (CBC) Eleanor Collins was the first black artist in North America to have their own nationally broadcast television show. (Franz Lindner/CBC) The B.C. Entertainment Hall of Fame star belonging to Eleanor Collins. (Judith Maxie) A portrait of musical artist Eleanor Collins. (Franz Lindner/CBC) Facebook Advertisementcenter_img Login/Register With: When asked about the significance of breaking the colour barrier in 1950’s television, she responded with typical humility.“I don’t think I was aware, completely, how different it was. I had no idea. I just came and did the things I thought I could do,” Collins told On the Coast host Gloria Macarenko.“Many years later they say that was, for the time, a very good job that you did.” When it comes to jazz, Vancouver may not be New Orleans, or New York, or even New Hampshire for that matter.Yet Vancouverites can claim a significant pioneer of musical and television history who saw her career flourish here and who chose to remain despite the siren call of south-of-the-border suitors. Twitter LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Advertisement Among a lengthy list of accolades is the Order of Canada, in which she was commended for her “pioneering achievements as a jazz vocalist, and for breaking down barriers and fostering race relations in the mid-20th Century.”In 1955 — over a year before the Nat King Cole TV show aired in the U.S. — Collins became Canada’s first woman, and North America’s first person of colour, to have their own nationally broadcast television show on CBUT (CBC Vancouver).last_img read more

Mayawati to meet Sonia Rahul today

first_imgNEW DELHI: Mayawati will meet with Congress president Rahul Gandhi and his mother Sonia Gandhi on Monday in what is seen as a significant outreach after the Bahujan Samaj Party (BSP) chief carried out an acrimonious campaign that was unsparing of the Congress.The former Uttar Pradesh chief minister attacked the BJP and the Congress in the same breath throughout her campaign in the national election, for which she teamed up with old rival Samajwadi Party. But even as she left the Congress out of her gathbandhan in UP, Mayawati said all the votes of the alliance would go to the Congress in Amethi and Raebareli, the constituencies of Rahul Gandhi and Sonia Gandhi. Mayawati’s meeting with the Congress top two is the latest in a series of meetings among opposition parties ahead of the results on Thursday, May 23. The three were last seen in public together when Janata Dal Secular leader HD Kumaraswamy took oath last year as chief minister of a coalition government with the Congress. Mayawati and Sonia Gandhi’s big smiles and forehead bump portrayed bonhomie that was not to be for long. The two parties failed to agree on seat sharing for the Madhya Pradesh state polls, and a furious Mayawati started clubbing the Congress along with the BJP as her top enemies. But now that the polls are over and talk revolves around numbers, Mayawati realizes that even if she wants the top post, no non-BJP coalition can come to power without Congress help. Meanwhile, continuing his efforts to unite opposition parties against the BJP ahead of Lok Sabha results, Andhra Pradesh Chief Minister N Chandrababu Naidu on Sunday met Sonia Gandhi, Rahul Gandhi, Sharad Pawar and Sitaram Yechury, among other leaders. He had on Saturday also held talks with several opposition leaders, including Loktantrik Janata Dal leader Sharad Yadav in the national capital and with SP chief Akhilesh Yadav and BSP supremo Mayawati in Lucknow. Naidu met Congress president Rahul Gandhi and Nationalist Congress Party chief Pawar for the second consecutive day on Sunday morning, followed by a meeting with Sonia Gandhi in the evening. He also held a separate meeting with CPI(M) general secretary Yechury and discussed the possibility of all opposition parties getting together. The TDP chief’s efforts are being seen as part of the opposition strategy to bring all the non-NDA parties together and form an alliance to keep the BJP out of power. Naidu’s meeting with Sonia Gandhi assumes significance as the latter held an internal meeting with top Congress leaders Saturday evening to assess the party’s process and strategy to stake claim for government formation incase of a hung verdict on May 23 when the results are announced. The Telugu Desam Party president has held several rounds of discussion with various opposition leaders, including TMC supremo Mamata Banerjee, AAP national convener Arvind Kejriwal and CPI (M) general secretary Sitaram Yechury. Naidu’s TDP was part of the NDA, but quit the alliance a few months ago. The Congress and other opposition parties have exuded confidence of forming the next government. With agency inputslast_img read more

The Spurs Were an Outlier of Unselfishness

The popular narrative for the NBA Finals that just concluded is pretty straightforward: The San Antonio Spurs “play basketball the way it’s supposed to be played,” and they beat the star-studded Miami Heat in what Zach Lowe called “the triumph of the NBA’s beautiful game.” The Spurs’ offense whipped the ball around, and Miami couldn’t handle such a multifaceted attack. The Heat, on the other hand, were forced to rely on what is increasingly becoming their Big One. LeBron James was epic throughout the playoffs and had an MVP-quality performance in the finals, but the top-heavy Heat collapsed under their own weight.A variety of statistics back up this description of the difference between the two teams, if not the normative judgment. For example, the Spurs had nine different players take four or more field goal attempts per game throughout the playoffs, compared to just six for Miami. More advanced statistics show something similar.One stat we can use to see how much offensive responsibilities are being spread around is “usage rate,” which estimates the percentage of a team’s possessions that were “used” by a particular player. Possessions are “used” by making field goal attempts, getting fouled or turning the ball over. Players such as James, Kevin Durant and Carmelo Anthony typically “use” a lot of possessions because they handle the ball a lot, take a lot of shots and play a lot of minutes. And because there are only so many possessions to go around, one player’s high usage rate means fewer scoring opportunities for his teammates. Teams like the Spurs, however, spread the ball around more, and more players get significant minutes, so they have a more flat distribution of possessions used.Here’s a look at how top-heavy NBA teams were in 2014, with the Spurs and Heat singled out:The x-axis on this graph is a player’s rank in a team’s usage rate, and the y-axis is the difference between the number of possessions that player used per game and the number used by the player with the highest rate. The lower the line, the more evenly a team distributes its chances across its players.Depending on how deep down the roster you look, the Heat are between the second- and fourth-most top-heavy team, while the Spurs are one of the most balanced. So that backs up the narrative.On the other hand, spreading the ball around isn’t easy, and it’s not the normal path to victory in the NBA. The most top-heavy team (and the top line on the chart) is the Oklahoma City Thunder, who had the second-best record in basketball and did better against this Spurs team than Miami did. The most evenly distributed team overall was the Brooklyn Nets, who did make the playoffs but lost in five games to the Heat.The Spurs won a lot more than we would expect for a team as balanced as they are. The 15 teams with the largest gaps between their top player and their eighth player (by possessions used per game) won 57.5 percent of their games, while the 15 with the smallest gaps won 42.5 percent (the Spurs were second-lowest).Of course, not all sharing is created equal: Sometimes a team has a more equitable distribution of possessions because it has a lot of talent and it needs to incorporate it all. Sometimes it does it because it has very little talent and doesn’t have anyone it can consistently rely on. Likewise, being top-heavy can be a result of having an overly ambitious shooter on a team, or it can just be that a team has a great player doing his job. read more

Derrick Mason Expected to Retire as a Raven

Wide receiver Derrick Mason appears ready to head into retirement as a member of the Baltimore Ravens.Derrick Mason retired from football five months ago, but it appears that he now wants to do so as a member of the Ravens.The Ravens are holding a press conference today at 3 p.m. that will include former WR Derrick Mason, general manager Ozzie Newsome and coach John Harbaugh.  Mason, 38, is the Ravens’ all-time leading receiver, piling up 5,777 yards and 471 receptions with the franchise. He played with the Ravens from 2005-2010.Derrick  Mason was released by the Ravens before the 2012 season. He decided to join the New York Jets instead of re-signing with the Ravens that season and was eventually traded to the Houston Texans.

Oh Hey — Theres Finally An NCAA Mens Tournament Favorite

The Final Four is set! And after 64 games, the FiveThirtyEight tournament model finally has a clear favorite. In this week’s video, we take a look at which team — UNC, Oklahoma, Villanova or (surprise!) Syracuse — has the best chance of winning it all, as well as how the probabilities have changed since before the tournament started. We also discuss how Syracuse’s run compares with the all-time great Cinderellas and crown a new “most exciting game” of the tournament.Check out FiveThirtyEight’s 2016 March Madness Predictions.

The Warriors Didnt Need Kevin Durant To Be This Good

The narrative going into the 2016-17 Warriors season was how unfair it was that one of the best teams of all time added one of the best players of all time to become unstoppable. And after the Warriors posted the best winning percentage in NBA postseason history and their star acquisition won the NBA Finals MVP, the narrative coming out of the season is much the same, only louder. But easy to lose in this narrative is the simple fact that the Warriors probably didn’t need Kevin Durant for the team to be this good — or at least almost this good. While adding Durant has been a success, it didn’t end up breaking basketball any more than the Warriors had broken it already.Counting the regular season and playoffs, the Warriors won 84 percent of their games this year — up from 83 percent last year and 81 percent the year before. Teams have only won 80+ percent of their combined season games 11 times in the 70-year history of the NBA.1The Bucks (1970-71 season) and Celtics (1985-86) have done it once each; the 76ers (1966-67, 1982-83), Lakers (1971-72, 1986-87), and Bulls (1995-96,1996-97) have done it twice each. The Warriors have now done it three years in a row.2The Warriors won 18 of the 22 games — 82 percent — that Durant didn’t play in this season.But the Warriors’ mission isn’t just to win titles, it’s to guarantee them. And Durant is both icing and insurance policy — a guarantee that the Warriors will always have an MVP-caliber, one-man offense available. Though he makes them a little bit better in his own right, his main value comes from making what happened to them in the 2016 playoffs less likely.So what does make them so good? And, more broadly, is greatness a matter of refining all aspects of a discipline, or does it stem from being freakishly good at one thing? The Warriors are the first dynasty in the ball-tracking era,3Tracking cameras have been installed in every NBA stadium since the 2013-14 season. which gives us an opportunity to measure their greatness in ways that we couldn’t for dynasties past.This, in turn, may also help answer the question of just how likely the Warriors are to regress to the mean. If their greatness is a confluence of factors, then there’s a whole lot of things that could go wrong to bring them back to earth. On the other hand, if their greatness is more about one thing, then maybe they can keep crushing the game indefinitely.The most dominant three-year dynasty everThe Warriors are an offensive juggernaut — but they’re more than that as well. We can see how much they’re contributing to their margins elsewhere by comparing their offensive rating (points scored per 100 possessions) to their SRS (margin of victory adjusted for strength of schedule), like so: This uses the SportsVu optical tracking data to judge offensive and defensive shooting versus league averages — it’s pretty similar to offensive and defensive ratings, but with rebounding and fouls taken out so we can concentrate on just shots taken and defended. Over their three-year run, the Warriors have been the best on both ends of the floor when it comes to both making and defending shots. Even so, their offensive prowess is particularly absurd.Another thing we can do to compare their offense and defense is to break them down two-dimensionally: by the quality of the shots taken or allowed (based on each shot’s modeled expectation), and then by how good a team was at scoring or preventing each shot, given that expectation. This relies heavily on my shot-value model, which accounts for shot type, shot location, shot clock, dribbles, time held, home court, defender position, defender distance, defender height and more.4The “more” is that I include one of STATS/SportsVu’s proprietary “shot difficulty” metrics as a variable in my model, though it isn’t weighted very heavily. While they’ve scored about 7 more points per 100 possessions than league average, they’ve also been 10.6 points better than their opponents overall — so about a third of their edge seems to come from something other than offensive efficiency.But it isn’t rare for teams with stronger-than-average offenses to also have stronger-than-average defenses. This is a bit counterintuitive — it seems like a great offensive team would be more likely to be weak on defense, since those are two very different skillsets and trade-offs must be made. And teams do, in fact, have to choose between more offense or more defense, so it’s significant that the relationship isn’t negative at all.The offense can make the defenseTo understand the sometimes complicated relationship between offense and defense, take the case of Dennis Rodman. Despite being known as a great defensive player, Rodman’s teams defended just about as well with or without him. And despite him being unable (or unwilling) to score himself, his teams were significantly more efficient on offense when he was on the court (even after accounting for his offensive rebounding). I suspect this is because having Rodman in the game allowed his teams to devote fewer resources to defending and rebounding, diverting those energies to offense instead. Similarly, having a highly efficient outside offense may allow a team to divert resources to the other end of the floor — not to mention that having your offensive players hang out more in the space between their opponents and their opponent’s basket can make their defensive job easier.So let’s compare the Warriors’ offense and defense a bit more directly: The Warriors are respectable at shooting inside the arc, but have been more than twice as good as the next-best team at shooting 3s in this period. They’re so good at it that there’s an argument that they should be doing it even more often, and that Curry — still the best shooter the game has ever seen — should be doing it way more often.You can throw more defense at them, and teams have done so — as you see in the breakdown chart above, they’re pretty close to average in 3-point shot quality already. But the Warriors are still better at shooting 3s than any other team is at anything — 3s, 2s or defense. And diverting more and more resources toward keeping them from scoring 130+ points per game (as they would if they got off a typical Warriors dynasty-era 3 on every possession), comes at a price. Opponents are working so hard to stop the 3 that they’re almost certainly losing something from their offense or 2-point defense, which likely helps explain why the Warriors get so many open looks inside the arc.Part of being good at lots of things is being really good at a couple of things. Curry’s ridiculous shooting opens up the Warriors’ offense. Not only are his shots incredibly efficient, but he also draws so much of his opponents’ attention that he makes his teammates look amazing — and makes his team immensely better. Looking at NBAWowy, which tracks how teams perform with a given player on the court versus on the bench, the Warriors outscored their opponents by 3.1 points per 100 possessions when Durant was playing and Curry was not; that number jumped to 16.1 points per 100 possessions with Curry on the court and Durant on the sidelines.5And 19.5 points per 100 possessions when they were both playing.While Durant may be the story of the season, the Warriors’ dynasty was built and is still being propped up by Curry’s ability to throw the ball into the hoop from great distances. Provided he keeps being able to do that, expect Golden State to keep the game broken. This shows that the Warriors appear to have a lot of players who are better at defense than they should be. Perhaps being free to focus on defense more than rebounding and offense helps. Perhaps they play bigger than their size in part because they’re typically in better position than you would expect from players on a more conventional offense whose goal is literally to get behind the other team. Perhaps opponents have to play offense with an extra eye on defense, or with more defenders than they would usually play.Also, having people like Stephen Curry and Durant as the offensive centerpieces may allow you to surround them with players who are more defense-oriented. Much like Rodman, someone like Draymond Green’s value may be fully realized precisely because he isn’t required to carry his offense. For a power forward, his responsibilities don’t include that much penetrating and collapsing the Warriors opponents’ defenses. Thus, despite being somewhat undersized for his position, Green has thrived — and indeed, may be one of the most valuable players in the league — in his current role.And Curry’s shooting makes the offenseWhile the link between Golden State’s offense and defense is speculative, the relationship between their 3-point shooting and their other shooting is easier to track.Golden State’s relentless barrage of 3s tends to make people forget that the Warriors are also good at 2-point shooting. The difference is that much more of their value on 2s comes from getting good shots, while more of their value on 3s comes from making the shots they get. Typically there is a relationship between how good a team is compared to expectation for both 3- and 2-point shooting, which is unsurprising since we’d expect good shooters to be good shooters, no matter where they’re shooting from. But the Warriors are not only unusually good at 3-point shooting, they’re also better at 3-point shooting than other shooting by an unusual margin. Comparing the two directly, we can see where the Warriors really butter their bread: read more

Lavender has last chance to leave her ideal legacy

In her first three seasons at Ohio State, Jantel Lavender has accomplished almost everything one could expect from the Cleveland-native center. But OSU coach Jim Foster thinks her career is yet to be defined. “I think Jantel’s career will be measured by championships more so than points scored,” Foster said. Postseason success is the biggest element missing from Lavender’s resume. In Lavender’s time at OSU, only once has her team advanced past the second round of the NCAA Tournament. “We haven’t had the postseason run that we need to,” Lavender said. “Our team just has to be more strong and more together and, you know, more cohesive, for us to go far.” Lavender enters the 2010-11 season as one of the most decorated players in college basketball. She was selected to the Associated Press Preseason All-American team and the watch list for the Wooden Award, which is awarded to the best male and female athletes in college basketball. She was also named the Preseason Big Ten Player of the Year. Should Lavender win her fourth straight Big Ten Player of the Year award after the season, she would be the first in conference history to do so. Lavender said she has her sights set beyond just earning all-conference honors. “The goal is to be a national player of the year,” Lavender said. She has all the tools to earn that honor. In her first three seasons at OSU, Lavender has averaged 20 points and 10.3 rebounds per game and is 534 points shy of Katie Smith’s OSU career scoring record, as well as 63 rebounds short of Tracey Hall’s OSU career rebounding record. Lavender said individual accomplishments come second to team goals. “If my team needs me to get 30, or if my team needs me to get 18 points and 25 rebounds, then that’s what I’m trying to do,” she said. Lavender’s career has gotten help from junior point guard Samantha Prahalis, who is on pace to break the school’s career assist record this season. “Sammy in the open floor is very, very talented, she really is, and you like a complement to that,” Foster said. “Not often is that complement a (center). Usually you see guards finishing plays. To have a center who can run like that, catch like that and finish like that, I think that’s a little different.” Foster compared the chemistry between his point guard and center to that of NBA Hall of Fame members and former Utah Jazz teammates Karl Malone and John Stockton. “That’s a fair one,” Prahalis said when asked about the comparison. “He always says that.” Lavender said she agreed with the evaluation but offered her own comparison for the duo. “I always try to say, you know, (Steve) Nash and (Amar’e) Stoudemire,” Lavender said. “I think that his comparison is just something to make us see where we are in our game.” After this season, Lavender will take her professional-ready game to the next level, where she is projected to be a top-five pick in the 2011 WNBA Draft. But first, she has some unfinished business. “I don’t think that we’ve gotten to the place that I want to be, you know, as a far as a team,” Lavender said. “I want a national championship.” read more

Ohio State softball says WTF on eve of 2012 season

After earning an unsatisfying 14-37 record last year, the Ohio State softball team has developed a new, inspirational motto as the 2012 season opens on Friday: “WTF.” “We’ve thrown that out a lot, with a more politically correct meaning than it usually has,” said coach Linda Kalafatis. “WTF,” an acronym for “worst to first,” is a catchphrase developed to motivate the team after a 2011 season that Kalafatis described as disappointing. “Defeat is the greatest motivator,” she said. The Buckeyes’ troubles began early in the 2011 campaign. Five starters, including Big Ten Freshman of the Year Melanie Nichols, had to be replaced due to season-ending injuries and graduation. Nichols, a pitcher, underwent surgery on her right shoulder in July 2010. She played in six games the following year but sat out for the remainder of the season per doctors’ orders. Lindsay Bodeker, an OSU graduate and former pitcher, would have been a redshirt senior last year. Bodeker re-injured her right knee from damage done to her ACL in 2008 and did not return after graduating. “We were pretty challenged on the mound,” Kalafatis said. Megan Coletta, junior third baseman and co-captain, said she is looking for redemption this year. “After last season and everything we went through, we want to prove that just because you have one bad year, you can come back,” she said. Coletta said she hopes to lead her team by concentrating on the mental aspect of the game. “(The underclassmen) are fresh. They don’t understand how grueling it’s going to be mentally and physically,” she said. “That’s what the veterans are working on.” The women of the OSU softball team have set goals of achieving Big Ten and World Series success, and after only one practice this week, they said they are excited to get started. “The team has been pretty focused,” Kalafatis said. “At times we didn’t look as sharp as we’d like, but the kids are ready to get out and play.” The Buckeyes finished last in Big Ten standings in 2011 with a record of 3-17, defeating Minnesota twice in a doubleheader in early April and Michigan State in May. With a “WTF” mentality, OSU will need to rally past every Big Ten opponent including No. 15-ranked Michigan. The Wolverines finished last season with a 53-6 record on their way to claiming the conference title. Senior shortstop Alicia Herron said she has her sights set on Michigan for the upcoming season. “With the way the Big Ten is set up, we play each team three times,” Herron said. “I keep saying ‘MX3,’ you know, Michigan times three. Defeating Michigan would be huge.” Herron, also a co-captain, led the team offensively with several team bests. Nine home runs, 10-for-10 stolen bases, 39 runs scored and a .354 batting average in 2011 are just some of her accomplishments. The Buckeyes begin a long, 23-game stretch on the road on Friday when they travel to Clermont, Fla., to take on the University of Central Florida. The team will see Las Vegas, Nev., Cathedral City, Calif., Orlando, Fla., and Nashville, Tenn., before returning home to Buckeye Field on March 24. Herron said she is most looking forward to “going out with a bang” with a team that is short on words, but strong in spirit. “We are obviously a young team,” Herron said. “We have so many new players, but I think the experience will come once we start playing. The heart and everything is all there.” read more

Commentary Glory at stake in NFL conference championship games

In one of the most popular professional sports league in the United States, there’s a lot at stake when a win means a trip to the Super Bowl. Arguably, though, this NFL Championship Sunday is putting a little bit more on the line than just a spot in the biggest annual sports spectacle in the world. Tom Brady, Bill Belichick, Ray Lewis, Joe Flacco, Matt Ryan, Colin Kaepernick and the Harbaugh brothers will all be playing this weekend for a chance to hoist the coveted Lombardi trophy. With all of those big names involved, it’s inevitable that either history will be made, legacies will be solidified, or reputations will again be up for debate for at least another year. Last weekend Brady passed his boyhood idol and NFL legend Joe Montana on the list for most all-time playoff wins with 17. But while playoff wins are quite a resume builder for most, with Brady’s first ballot Hall of Fame induction already locked up, it’s more likely that the Montana record that Brady really wants to associate himself with is four Super Bowl wins. With a victory against the Ravens in Foxborough on Sunday, Brady will have a chance to match Montana’s mark and solidify his place in the argument of the greatest quarterback in NFL history. Not to mention, a win would extend his and Bill Belichick’s record of most Super Bowl appearances as a quarterback-head coach duo. On the other side of the field in Foxborough, Ray Lewis will be doing everything in his power to stop Brady from accomplishing that goal. With a win on Sunday, Lewis will give himself the chance to win a second Super Bowl and finish his historic career on top. Though Lewis is already considered the best leader and linebacker in the history of the league by most, a second ring to go along with his 13 pro-bowl selections would leave no doubt. Covering Lewis’ back on the offensive side of the ball in this game will be Flacco. If Flacco can help lead Lewis and company to New Orleans on Feb. 3, he can finally justify his self-proclamation as an “elite” quarterback. With a subpar performance and third AFC championship game loss in five years, though, Flacco will be eating his words, as well as those of the many NFL fans who think he is overrated and cocky. While the AFC side of championship weekend features two living legends, the story on the NFC side is about legacy building. Ryan of the Falcons silenced critics last weekend with a clutch drive in the waning moments of the game, allowing his kicker to ground the Seahawks with a game-winning field goal as time expired. However, with a loss at home to San Francisco in the NFC championship game Sunday, that landmark victory for Ryan, as well as his hopes to build his legacy as an “elite” quarterback, might very well become a distant memory. Not only would a loss drop his career playoff record to a disappointing 1-4, but it would give Kaepernick twice as many crucial playoff wins as Ryan in less than half the tries. On that same note, with two playoff wins in nine career NFL starts, regular or postseason, and a Super Bowl appearance, a win in Atlanta would get Kaepernick off to a groundbreaking start to his career. He’d also be well on his way to building a legacy for himself as one of the premier running quarterbacks of all time. On top of all the personal glory that has the potential to be achieved with any of the four possible Super Bowl matchups, perhaps the most intriguing part of NFL Championship Sunday is that it holds the power to yield an historic “Harbaugh Bowl.” The drama involved with a John Harbaugh-led Ravens team squaring off against a Jim Harbaugh-led 49ers team would be unequalled. Everybody loves a big brother – little brother rivalry, but one that makes NFL history and results in bragging rights in the form of a Lombardi Trophy, now that is glorious. read more