D’Angelo’s Solo Piano Cover Of Prince’s ‘Venus Di Milo’ Is Beautiful

first_imgThe death of Prince has been mourned the world over, as the tragic Purple One passed away last Thursday at the age of 57. While most everyone has performed tributes to the late great artist, those closest to him, musically speaking, have remained somewhat silent.In a truly emotional moment, the great D’Angelo sat down at a Wurlitzer piano and performed a solo version of Prince’s “Venus Di Milo.” Captured just days after Prince’s death, D’Angelo is clearly mourning the loss of someone so inspirational to his own music. While the tribute is only two minutes in length, it is a truly moving tribute to the late artist.Listen to D’Angelo’s take on “Venus Di Milo,” below:The R&B star will also appear on tonight’s episode of The Tonight Show With Jimmy Fallon for a tribute to Prince, alongside some special guests not yet announced. Tune in tonight!last_img

Edin Dzeko broke another Record?

first_imgLast night, Edin Dzeko became recorder by the number of appearances for the National football team of BiH.The captain of the National football team of BiH played his 95th match in the jersey of our national team, and thus he surpassed our former captain Emir Spahic.Our well-known defender Spahic played 94 matches for the team of BiH, and Roma’s attacker Dzeko recorded his 95th appearance for the national team.Dzeko holds two records now, according to the number of appearances (95) and the number of scores (52) that he achieved in the National team of BiH.If his health serves him, Dzeko will become the first player with a triple number of appearances for our national team during qualifiers for the European Championship in 2020.(Source: E. B./Klix.ba)last_img

England quartet target European team title

first_img4 Apr 2018 England quartet target European team title English amateur champion Todd Clements and fellow internationals David Hague, Matthew Jordan and Gian-Marco Petrozzi will represent England in the European Nations Cup later this month.They will be targeting England’s seventh victory in the championship, which will be played at Sotogrande, Spain, from 18-21 April. England’s most recent win was in 2015.The team:Todd Clements, 21, (Braintree, Essex) won the 2017 English amateur championship and is currently the leading England player in the world amateur rankings at 17th. He recently played all four rounds of the Omega Dubai Desert Classic. (Image copyright Leaderboard Photography)David Hague, 21, (Malton & Norton, Yorkshire) won twice last season – the Lagonda Trophy and the North of England amateur – and followed up this year with fine form on a tour of Australia, taking second place in the Avondale amateur.Matthew Jordan, 22, (Royal Liverpool, Cheshire) was England’s top male amateur last year after playing his way into the Walker Cup team with a string of classy performances including a win in the St Andrews Links Trophy. He is currently 19th in the world.Gian-Marco Petrozzi, 20, (Trentham, Staffordshire) is a consistent title challenger and won the 2018 New South Wales Amateur on a tour of Australia and was last year’s Welsh open stroke play champion.England quartet target European team titleEnglish amateur champion Todd Clements and fellow internationals David Hague, Matthew Jordan and Gian-Marco Petrozzi will represent England in the European Nations Cup later this month.They will be targeting England’s seventh victory in the championship, which will be played at Sotogrande, Spain, from 18-21 April. England’s most recent win was in 2015.The team:Todd Clements, 21, (Braintree, Essex) won the 2017 English amateur championship and is currently the leading England player in the world amateur rankings at 17th. He recently played all four rounds of the Omega Dubai Desert Classic. (Image copyright Leaderboard Photography)David Hague, 21, (Malton & Norton, Yorkshire) won twice last season – the Lagonda Trophy and the North of England amateur – and followed up this year with fine form on a tour of Australia, taking second place in the Avondale amateur.Matthew Jordan, 22, (Royal Liverpool, Cheshire) was England’s top male amateur last year after playing his way into the Walker Cup team with a string of classy performances including a win in the St Andrews Links Trophy. He is currently 19th in the world.Gian-Marco Petrozzi, (Trentham, Staffordshire) is a consistent title challenger and won the 2018 New South Wales Amateur on a tour of Australia and was last year’s Welsh open stroke play champion. Tags: European, Nations Cuplast_img read more

Doors open for Preston after SafeGolf accreditation

first_imgWhen it came to achieving SafeGolf status, Preston Golf Club was well aware of the social and welfare benefits that accreditation would bring.With the help and advice of England Golf’s Club Support Officer, Adam McAlister, creating a secure environment for young people and vulnerable groups to enjoy their golf was uppermost in the Lancashire club’s thinking.However, the club has been thrilled at the other advantages that have followed as a consequence of being a SafeGolf club.Chris Preston led the drive towards SafeGolf accreditation ably assisted by two colleagues at his club – junior organiser Charlie Webb and Penny Beckett, the child welfare officer and club president.Chris is proud that Preston Golf Club has become a leading light in Lancashire for SafeGolf which will become a mandatory part of England Golf affiliation for all clubs from January 2021.Chris explained: “The safeguarding and social benefits of SafeGolf are obvious.“We want to make sure everyone- young and old – can enjoy golf in a safe and fun environment at Preston Golf Club.“But on top of making sure we look after the welfare of our golfers, there are other benefits which our club is now enjoying.“Because we are a SafeGolf club we have just received notification that we are to become an HSBC Golf Roots Centre in 2020.“Aside from creating a culture of care at the club, the SafeGolf status is opening other avenues for the club to explore.“We are in discussions with Jamie Blair (England Golf’s Inclusion and Wellbeing manager) about a blind golf programme and are working with a local group called Galloway’s Society for the Blind.“We are encouraging golfers with disabilities too and are also in the process of putting together a separate package for local schools.“Without SafeGolf accreditation we wouldn’t be able to approach local schools with our ideas.”Chris is encouraging all clubs to focus their mind on the SafeGolf process in 2020 and to interact with their CSOs in the delivery of the accreditation.“We found our CSO Adam’s input invaluable in terms of getting SafeGolf over the line,” he added.“I would advise clubs to try and work on it over the winter months as when the playing season starts in the spring the pressures of that can take over.“The templates on the England Golf website were extremely useful and together with Adam’s insight helped us achieve our accreditation.“We followed structured steps and broke it down to pro staff and junior volunteers and made sure all relevant people had the necessary checks.“SafeGolf can be primarily for young people and vulnerable groups but we are also looking at our seniors and making sure we look after their interests.“That might just be when they are out on the course themselves or in a broader sense with initiatives around dementia.“One of our members, Steve Elliot, has been diagnosed with dementia and together with his wife Mags we are driving forward with an initiative designed to help Steve and others remain engaged with golf.” Tags: Preston Golf Clublast_img read more

Olympia Gardening Expert Gives Tips On Successfully Growing Tomatoes In Our…

first_imgSubmitted by Mary Jo BuzaDid you know that at one time people were afraid to eat tomatoes?  Called ‘wolf pears’ tomatoes were scorned because it was thought that the red fruit was poisonous.  Lucky for us, some careless or perhaps fearless person decided to eat the tempting red fruit and lived!  Today, the tomato is a vegetable we consistently use in our kitchens. Could you image a summer salad without tomatoes?As much as we love tomatoes, growing them in the South Sound regions is a frustrating endeavor.  If the crop is not destroyed by the dreaded late tomato blight, our cool summer temperatures slow the ripening so much that your bumper crop of tomatoes are still green in September.I usually plant tomatoes in early June. But with the spectacular warm May, savvy gardeners got a jump on the weather and planted early with little risk of a late frost. Here are my secrets to growing tomatoes in the South Sound and attain the coveted ripe, red fruit.Tip #1 Grow the Crop under Clear Plastic: The best crop of tomatoes I have ever seen were grown on the south side of a house with an attached a wood frame for the plastic. The plastic increases the temperatures enough to ripen fruit and extends crop production long after the first frosts in September. The plastic will also keep the rain off which inhibits the late tomato blight.Tip #2 Use Soaker Hoses: Overhead watering promotes the dreaded late tomato blight.  The blight lives dormant in the soil waiting for contact with the leaves of your tomato plant. Tomatoes are infected when water splashing from the soil hits the leaves. The tiny drops of water carry fungal spores from the soil to the leaves.  Using soaker hoses eliminates this potential problem.  Another secret to growing tomatoes is to reduce the amount and frequency of watering once the fruit begins to ripen sometime in August.  This will hasten the ripening process.Tip#3 Stake Tomato Plants:  Why go to all the trouble to stake tomatoes?  There are several reasons. One, you can grow more tomatoes in a smaller space; plants can be set as little as 24 inches apart.  Second, the fruits tend to ripen earlier and are larger.  Third, the tomatoes have better air circulation which decreases disease problems. And lastly, growing tomatoes on stakes keeps them out the reach of slugsTomatoes are broken into two classifications: determinate and indeterminate. Tomatoes suitable for growing as a single vine are the indeterminate varieties. Determinate varieties are bushier and are not suitable for staking or trellising.  Indeterminate varieties grow more like a vine but require training.The ABC’s of Growing a Tomato Plants as a VinePlace the StakesIt may be hard to imagine that your puny four-inch tomato plant will need a stake, but don’t be misled. Once the plant sets fruit it will need a sturdy support.   A 2×2 wooden stake about eight feet long cut to a point at the bottom works best.  Some lumber yards will cut the points, but you will need to ask.To avoid root damage, place the stakes before you set out your transplants. Sink the stake about two feet into the ground.  This provides enough stability to prevent the plants from falling over when heavy with fruit.Tying the PlantsTying the plants is necessary because indeterminate tomatoes are not a true vine and have no way to support them. Any coarse twine will work.  Be careful not to tie the plants too tightly and cut into the stems.  You will be surprised at how fast your tomatoes grow.  I check and tie my plants about once a week.PruningThe concept of pruning tomato plants is baffling.  But a staked tomato is best grown as a single stem.  In each leaf axil, where the leaf stem joins the main stem, a lateral shoot will grow.  These lateral shoots need to be removed, before they grow longer than an inch or two.  I use my fingers to snap off the lateral shoots.  Fingers actually work better than pruners or a knife. I check and prune out lateral shoots once a week.PinchingOnce the plant has grown to the top of your stake, prune out the growing tip.  This will direct the plant’s energy into ripening the fruit.  This will accelerate the ripening process and increase the size of the fruit.Author Mary Jo Buza, is a landscape designer she has more than 25 years experience maintaining, designing, and teaching gardening in the South Sound region.  For more information on a custom landscape design or consultation call 923-1733. Check out her website: www.maryjobuza.com. Facebook123Tweet0Pin8last_img read more

Adopt-A-Pet Dog of the Week

first_imgFacebook8Tweet0Pin0My name is Abby, I am 6 ½ years old, and I love everyone and everything!  I enjoy walks, car rides, playing in the play yards with other dogs & volunteers!  I also like kids and cats. I am currently looking for a family that is willing to work with some of my environmental, climate, food allergies. I must find a family or person who lives in a warmer climate, either east of the mountains, or south. This climate would be ideal for me, and I would no longer suffer from the allergies. I am a yellow lab and will make the perfect companion and family member for years to come. I hope to meet you soon! Paws crossed and waiting!Adopt-A-Pet has many great dogs and always need volunteers. To see all our current dogs, visit www.adoptapet-wa.org, Facebook at “Adopt-A-Pet of Shelton Washington” or at the shelter on Jensen Road. For more information, email us at [email protected]  or call the shelter at 360-432-3091.last_img