Report says three journalists died in prison camp in northeastern desert

first_img Reporters Without Borders today called on the Eritrean government to urgently produce evidence that three journalists illegally held since September 2001 are still alive, as information from credible sources indicates they died in the course of the past 20 months in a detention centre at a place called Eiraeiro, in a remote northeastern desert.The organisation wrote to the Eritrean embassy in France on 9 October asking the government to provide an explanation “within a reasonable period” about these “very disturbing reports.” If we do not get a reply from you in the near future, our organisation will publish this information,” said the letter, which did not receive a response.“This silence on the part of the Eritrean authorities is inhumane and intolerable,” Reporters Without Borders said today. “Dozens of political prisoners have disappeared into jails run by the armed forces. They include at least 13 journalists, of whom there has been no word for nearly five years.”The organisation added: “We now have extremely disturbing revelations in the report on the Eiraeiro detention centre. No foreign government should continue to have any dealings with President Issaias Afeworki and his government without insisting on serious, documented explanations.”The report on Eiraeiro, located in the Sheib subzone of the Northern Red Sea administrative region, was posted on the Internet in August. It contains precise and verifiable information about the exact location of the detention centre, where at least 62 political prisoners were said to be held, including former ministers, another senior officials, high-ranking military officers, government opponents and eight of the 13 journalists held since a round-up in September 2001. Initially published in the Tigrinya language on 17 August on aigaforum.com, an Ethiopian website, it was translated into English and posted on 31 August on awate.com, an Eritrean opposition site that is edited in the United States. Reporters Without Borders knows the sources for the information in the report, although it will not identify them for security reasons, and believes them to be credible and serious.The Eiraeiro detention centre is said to have been built in this northeastern desert in 2003. An Eritrean journalist in exile told Reporters Without Borders that it is “one of the country’s hottest areas.” To get to Eiraeiro, you reportedly have to walk for two hours from the nearest road, linking Serjeka and Gahtelay, northwest of Filfil Selomuna. Consisting of 62 cells measuring 3 metres by 3 metres, it is said to contain detainees who were previously held in Embatkala, in the east of the country.The prisoners named in the report include Seyoum Tsehaye (or Fsehaye), a freelance journalist (cell No. 10), Dawit Habtemichael, deputy editor and co-founder of Meqaleh (cell No. 12), a journalist identified by the first name “Yosief” or “Yusuf,” who is almost certainly Yusuf Mohamed Ali, the editor of Tsigenay (cell No. 9), Medhane Tewelde (almost certainly Medhane Haile), deputy editor and co-founder of Keste Debena (cell No. 8), Temesghen Gebreyesus, journalist and member of the Keste Debena board (cell No. 23), Said Abdulkader, editor and founder of Admas (cell No. 24), and Emanuel Asrat, editor of Zemen (cell No. 25).An Eritrean former political prisoner now in exile told Reporters Without Borders on condition on anonymity that Fessahaye “Joshua” Yohannes, a playwright and journalist with the newspaper Setit, is now also being held at Eiraeiro, in cell No. 18. He was previously held in Dongolo prison in the south of the country, in an underground cell measuring just 1.5 metres by 1.5 metres, and 2.5 metres tall, lit by a bulb that was never turned off. One of his friends, who said he was held at the same time as Yohannes and who now lives in exile, told Reporters Without Borders that Yohannes was subjected to various forms of torture including having his finger-nails ripped out.They are all part of a group of 13 journalists who were rounded up by the police during the week of 18 to 25 September 2001 after the government decided to “suspend” all of Eritrea’s privately-owned media and ordered the arrest of everyone considered to a member of the opposition.The report says at least nine of the detainees at Eiraeiro have died as a result of “various illnesses, psychological pressure or suicide.” They include three of the journalists named above – Yusuf Mohamed Ali, who reportedly died on 13 June, Medhane Haile, who reportedly died in February, and Said Abdulkader, who reportedly died in March 2005.All of the Eritreans consulted by Reporters Without Borders said the information contained in the report was “entirely plausible,” at the very least, even if it could not currently be verified. An Eritrean journalist now in exile said that when he was held at a detention centre like Eiraeiro in 2000: “Many prisoners held at the same time as me died as a result of malaria attacks or other illnesses. Their bodies were thrown in unmarked common graves. In some cases, the authorities led their families to believe they had escaped or were killed by Ethiopians.”The report contains harrowing descriptions of conditions at Eiraeiro. Most of the detainees are chained by their hands. They sleep on the ground and have no bed linen. Their heads and beards are shaved once a month. Since February, they have been let out of their cells for an hour a day but without being allowed contact with other prisoners. Any attempt to converse with the camp’s guards is immediately punished.Since 2001, Reporters Without Borders and other human rights and press freedom groups have been calling for the release of Eritrea’s political prisoners, including the 13 journalists arrested in the round-up of September of that year. The Eritrean government claims they are being held as part of a parliamentary investigation into “spying” and “treason.”The “suspension” of the privately-owned media came as the second war with Ethiopia was ending in 2001, when the independent press relayed calls for democratisation by 15 senior ruling party members known as the “Group of 15” or “G-15” and the government reacted on 18 September 2001 by cracking down on the G-15 and the opposition. After 10 of the detained journalists staged a hunger strike, they were transferred in April 2002 to detention centres in undisclosed locations. Swedish prosecutors again refuse to investigate Dawit Isaak case EritreaAfrica News Reporters Without Borders today called on the Eritrean government to urgently produce evidence that three journalists illegally held since September 2001 are still alive, as information from credible sources indicates they died in the course of the past 20 months in a detention centre at a place called Eiraeiro, in a remote northeastern desert. November 14, 2006 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Report says three journalists died in prison camp in northeastern desert Prisoner of Conscience Since 2001 – Why has Sweden not managed to bring Dawit Isaak home? News Receive email alerts January 13, 2021 Find out more News to go further Follow the news on Eritrea RSF urges Swedish judicial authorities to reverse Dawit Isaak decision April 14, 2021 Find out more RSF_en EritreaAfrica Reports Help by sharing this information Organisation October 27, 2020 Find out morelast_img read more

Video: Ascension of the Lord

first_img Community News Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadena First Heatwave Expected Next Week Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. Subscribe Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * HerbeautyThis Trend Looks Kind Of Cool!HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty12 Female Fashion Trends That Guys Can’t StandHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty15 Countries Where Men Have Difficulties Finding A WifeHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyHe Is Totally In Love With You If He Does These 7 ThingsHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty8 Easy Exotic Meals Anyone Can MakeHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyFinding The Right Type Of Workout For You According AstrologyHerbeautyHerbeauty EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS This video was delivered by Msgr. Clement J. Connolly, Pastor Emeritus, Holy Family Church on Sunday, May 17, 2015. Born in Limerick, Ireland, the middle child in a family of two boys and three girls Msgr. Connolly was raised in Ireland and later, England. He attended Seminary and graduated from St. Patrick’s College in Thurles, Ireland. Ordained to the priesthood in 1964 he was missioned to the Archdiocese of Los Angeles where he served in parish ministry until 1968. Monsignor was Secretary for Cardinal James Francis McIntyre from 1968-1970.Subsequently he was assigned as secretary to Cardinal Timothy Manning until Manning’s retirement in 1985. From 1984 until June 2009 Monsignor Connolly was the pastor of Holy Family Church in South Pasadena. He officially retired in July of 2010 and is now Spiritual Director of Holy Family Parish. His hobbies include golf, reading and travel.Holy Family Church, 1527 Fremont Ave., South Pasadena, (626) 799-8908 or visit holyfamily.org. Business News Top of the News center_img More Cool Stuff Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes 9 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy Community News Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  Sermons and Lessons Video: Ascension of the Lord Delivered by MSGR. CLEMENT J. CONNOLLY, Pastor Emeritus Holy Family Church Published on Monday, May 18, 2015 | 6:02 pm Make a commentlast_img read more

Keeping Coronavirus in Perspective

first_imgtop box 4 Keeping Coronavirus in Perspective Kaiser Permanente Infectious Disease Physician Urges Public Not to Panic STAFF REPORT Published on Monday, February 17, 2020 | 4:45 pm Herbeauty7 Most Startling Movie Moments We Didn’t Realize Were InsensitiveHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty6 Lies You Should Stop Telling Yourself Right NowHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty7 Reasons Why The Lost Kilos Are Regained AgainHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyIs It Bad To Give Your Boyfriend An Ultimatum?HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyThe Most Heartwarming Moments Between Father And DaughterHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyStop Eating Read Meat (Before It’s Too Late)HerbeautyHerbeauty 10 recommendedShareShareTweetSharePin it Coronaviruses (colored transmission electron microscopy image). © cdc/Dr. Fred Murphy & Sylvia WhitfieldAs hardly a day goes by without the coronavirus dominating the headlines, many people are rightfully concerned and wondering what steps they should take to protect themselves and their loved ones.Although taking precautions is important, Dr. Jonathan T. Truong, an infectious disease physician with Kaiser Permanente Southern California, notes it’s important not to overreact.“The coronavirus should be a cause of concern, but not alarm or panic,” Truong said. “The quarantine process of people who are being evacuated from China has been effective in controlling the spreading of the disease in America. As such, we need to keep things in perspective.”According to Truong noted there have been no deaths in the US so far resulting from the coronavirus. In contrast, he said between 200,000 and 400,000 Americans get hospitalized due to complications form the flu each year, and as many as 60,000 die.“We know that influenza is infectious and it kills, and we have a vaccine for it – let’s focus on that!” he said. “It’s important to be aware of coronavirus, but we have an opportunity to help prevent 50,000 to 60,000 deaths a year with a flu shot. Despite that, only about half of the US population gets vaccinated.”The chances of contracting the coronavirus are slim if you havbe not recently traveled to China, or been in close contact with a person infected by the disease.Simple precautions such as washing your hands frequently with soap or alcohol-based gel, not touching your eyes, mouth or face, cooking your food thoroughly, and keeping a distance of at least six feet from anyone who has a respiratory illness will help protect your health, Dr. Truong said.The symptoms of coronavirus symptoms include coughing, fever, shortness of breath and difficulty breathing. People exhibiting these symptoms should seek medical treatment.“If you’re sick, wear a mask so you don’t spread it,” Truong said. “If you need to see a doctor, it’s best to call ahead. We want to be prepared to prioritize your case, and avoid spreading infection to other patients.”For more information, visit https://about.kaiserpermanente.org/ Make a comment Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy Top of the News First Heatwave Expected Next Week More Cool Stuff EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *center_img Community News Business News Community News Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  Subscribe Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadenalast_img read more

Flow and retreat of the Late Quaternary Pine Island-Thwaites palaeo-ice stream, West Antarctica

first_imgMultibeam swath bathymetry and sub-bottom profiler data are used to establish constraints on the flow and retreat history of a major palaeo-ice stream that carried the combined discharge from the parts of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet now occupied by the Pine Island and Thwaites glacier basins. Sets of highly elongated bedforms show that, at the last glacial maximum, the route of the Pine Island-Thwaites palaeo-ice stream arced north-northeast following a prominent cross-shelf trough. In this area, the grounding line advanced to within similar to 68 km of, and probably reached, the shelf edge. Minimum ice thickness is estimated at 715 m on the outer shelf, and we estimate a minimum ice discharge of similar to 108 km(3) yr(-1) assuming velocities similar to today’s Pine Island glacier (similar to 2.5 km yr(-1)). Additional bed forms observed in a trough northwest of Pine Island Bay likely formed via diachronous ice flows across the outer shelf and demonstrate switching ice stream behavior. The “style” of ice retreat is also evident in five grounding zone wedges, which suggest episodic deglaciation characterized by halts in grounding line migration up-trough. Stillstands occurred in association with changes in ice bed gradient, and phases of inferred rapid retreat correlate to higher bed slopes, supporting theoretical studies that show bed geometry as a control on ice margin recession. However, estimates that individual wedges could have formed within several centuries still imply a relatively rapid overall retreat. Our findings show that the ice stream channeled a substantial fraction of West Antarctica’s discharge in the past, just as the Pine Island and Thwaites glaciers do today.last_img read more