Sherlock Holmes 3 Considers Filming in Morocco

Rabat – Will another Hollywood production shoot in Morocco? According to American movie-focused outlet Omega Underground, the third part of the Sherlock Holmes saga could film some scenes in locations within the Kingdom.Besides Morocco, the movie is already set to shoot primarily in London, the home of the characters.For this new adventure, American actor Robert Downey Jr. will again don his Sherlock Holmes suit, while British actor Jude Law will assume his role as Holmes’s sidekick, Dr. Watson. Original director Guy Ritchie has not been confirmed yet to return. Warner Bros. plans to release its production on December 25, 2020. The far-off launch date may be a result of the leading actor’s busy schedule. Downey Jr. just finished shooting the last Avengers film and Jude Law is about to wrap up filming for  Captain Marvel.Released in 2010, Sherlock Holmes is the story of the legendary detective of the same name, accompanied by his sidekick Dr. Watson; the duo relentlessly pursues criminals of all kinds. Holmes’s weapons are: a keen sense of observation and deduction, erudition, and curiosity.Morocco will welcome two other Hollywood productions this year. Keanu Reeves’s famous John Wick saga is revving up for round three in the kingdom. The Canadian actor is set to shoot in the North African country, following filming which began in Japan and Montreal April 25.Additionally, American actor, singer, and filmmaker Johnny Depp will soon fly to the kingdom with British actors Robert Pattinson and Mark Rylance to shoot Waiting for the Barbarians, produced by Colombian filmmaker Ciro Guerra.“We hope to start shooting at the end of the year in Morocco. It will be my first film outside of Colombia and in English,” said the director in a statement to AFP. read more

New committee to study port city project

The Government today said that it had appointed a fresh committee to study the possibility of continuing the port city project.Cabinet Spokesperson Rajitha Senaratne said thata proposal had been made by Prime Minister Ranil Wickremesinghe to the cabinet this week to appoint a committee of high ranking officials to consider the ability of permitting the continuation of the project which has remained suspended since March. “As per the recommendations of the committee appointed to review this project the construction work has currently been suspended. The proposal made by the Prime Minister, to appoint a committee of high ranking officials chaired by the Secretary to the Prime Minister for considering the ability of permitting the continuation of this project after correcting the lapses and procedures was approved by the cabinet of ministers,” Senaratne said. The 1.4 billion US dollar port city project funded by China Communications Construction Company LTD. was suspended by the new Sri Lankan government which took office in January after concerns were raised over some aspects of the project. Sri Lanka’s Deputy Minister of Highways Eran Wickramaratne recently said that there was no corruption involved in the Colombo Port City project and the only concern was if the proper procedures had been followed.The project began construction in September 2014 and is expected to attract 20 to 25 billion US dollars of foreign investments once completed. read more

Global Witness advises DRC companies on due diligence regarding conflict minerals

first_imgRebels, militias and army units have hijacked the trade in mineral ores from eastern Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), while subjecting the civilian population to massacres, rape, extortion, forced labour and forced recruitment of child soldiers. Congo’s `conflict minerals’ are laundered into the global supply chain by export houses, before being transformed into refined metals by large international smelting firms. The metals are then used in a wide range of products, including consumer electronic goods such as mobile phones and computers. Some of the world’s most famous brands are now coming under scrutiny to address their role in this devastating trade.Nobody forces companies to purchase minerals or metals mined in war zones. It is their choice. Those that source minerals or metals originating from eastern DRC need to show the public that they have procedures in place to prevent direct or indirect involvement with serious human rights abuses and other crimes. This is what is called `due diligence’.Despite the mounting pressure on companies that use minerals and metals to carry out due diligence, few are actually doing this. Some companies claim that it is too complicated or too difficult for them to do. Due diligence is a process that all reputable companies understand and employ on a regular basis to address risks ranging from corruption to environmental damage.This paper argues that the due diligence that companies using minerals or metals originating from eastern DRC needs to undertake consists of:• A conflict minerals policy• Supply chain risk assessments, including on the ground checks on suppliers• Remedial action to deal with any problems identified• Independent third party audits of their due diligence measures• Public reportingThe report outlines each of these elements and makes suggestions on how companies can put them into practice. By putting these measures in place, companies can help to create a mining sector in eastern DRC that brings real benefit to the people who live there. A due diligence-based approach to sourcing minerals and metals is not about imposing blanket bans on trade; it is about ensuring that business does not perpetuate armed violence, serious human rights abuses and other crimes.At the same time, a key message to companies that runs through this paper is that if they choose to use minerals or metals originating from eastern DRC they have a responsibility to demonstrate – by doing due diligence – that their activities are not causing harm. If they cannot do this, they must seek their supplies elsewhere.last_img